Five Knots You Need to Know

Master these five knots. In most cases, they’re the only ones you’ll ever need.

A Diagram of Knots | Construction Pro Tips
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All knotted up

You don't have to be a sailor or a boy scout to know your way around the knotted end of a rope. Knowing a few basic knots can actually be quite the life-saver. We've decided on what we think are the five essential knot types and given some instructions on how to ties them. Master these five knots; in most cases, they’re the only ones you’ll ever need.

A Bowline Knot | Construction Pro Tips

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Bowline

Use this knot to tie super -strong loops that can be easily untied. The bowline knot makes a secure loop at the end of a rope. And it has many uses; for example, you can use these knots to fasten a mooring line to a ring or a post.

The Figure 8 Knot | Construction Pro Tips
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Figure 8

A figure 8 is ideal when you need a stop knot in a rope. It could be for a series of knots in a climbing rope or at the end of a rope to serve as a hand grip. Sailors use it to keep lines from falling through pulleys on a sailboat.

Sheet Bend Knot | Construction Pro Tips
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Sheet Bend

These knots are recommended for joining two ropes of unequal diameters. The thicker rope should be the one with the simple loop at the end. It also works for similar -size ropes.

Double Half Hitches | Construction Pro Tips
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Double Half Hitches

Half hitches are for tying boats to piers, tent lines to stakes, and for many other uses.

Square Knot | Construction Pro Tips
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Square Knot

The square knot is used when you need to join two similar -size ropes together. It’s the easiest way to lengthen a rope. It’s also the go-to knot for securing parcels and rolled-up items such as tarps.