How To Install Mud In A Shower Floor (VIDEO)

Questions about how to create a mud shower base? Let this flooring pro show you the way.

In this video, veteran construction pro Sal DiBlasi shares how he installs mud in a shower floor.

Sal DiBlasi

Slavatore “Sal” DiBlasi has been in the flooring trade since 1984. He started out installing ceramic tile, VCT tile, Carpet, hard wood, and many other types of flooring surfaces. In about 1989, he decided it was time to work for himself and started out on his own. Sal has been self-employed in the Boston North Shore area ever since. He is a believer in doing things right and never cutting corners or rushing to finish a job.

Sal originally uploaded videos to his YouTube channel so that he could embed them onto his website, to show off his work and attract new customers. At some point he saw that he was getting quite a few views and decided to go with it and create some how-to videos. That was about 5 years ago. Now he has just shy of 700 videos.

Thanks for sharing your videos and experience, Sal!

How To Remove Tile From A Concrete Floor:

Create a smooth surface for new tile

If you don’t have room for another layer of tile over an old tile floor, you’ll have to scrap off the old tile. It’s a tough job, but the right tools will make it go faster.

There’s no easy way on how to remove tile installed over concrete. Unlike tile on cement board or wood, there’s no underlayment or subfloor that can be pried up and thrown away. Removing tile from concrete requires knocking out the tiles and adhesive. Removing tile takes time and hard work. Even a small bathroom will take half a day, at a minimum.

Use a 3/4- or 1-in. masonry chisel and a 2-lb. hand maul. Start at a broken tile or between tiles where the grout has loosened. Work the chisel under the tiles, forcing them loose. Strike the face of stubborn tiles to break them up for easier removal. Wear safety glasses, gloves, pants and a long-sleeve shirt, since hammering the tile sends sharp shards flying. Also wear a dust mask.

Typically, older floors with mastic adhesive will come up easier than floors laid with thinset mortar. Rent a small jackhammer with a chisel point if the tile refuses to come loose. For larger rooms, consider renting an electric tile stripper.

Breaking up old tile with a hammer and a chisel | Construction Pro Tips

After you remove the tiles, chisel and scrape the adhesive off the concrete as well. If you can’t get it all, don’t worry. You can leave bits of adhesive up to 1/8 in. thick. Then use the flat side of a 12-in. trowel to apply a 1/8-in. layer of latex thin-set mortar over the floor. This is to fill in voids and level around remaining bits of adhesive. If you’re installing new tile, use the same latex thin-set to set the tile. Thin-set holds ceramic tiles better than mastic and is easier to work with.

Keep in mind that the easiest solution of all is to leave the old tile in place and install new tile directly over the old. The new floor will be slightly higher, so you’ll have to trim the door and extend the toilet ring.

Smoothing out a concrete floor with a trowel | Construction Pro Tips

 

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